Asus Eee PC 1018P, WiCast EW2000 unboxing


Lookie what we have here. Our awesome friends at Asus has decided to send us over two new products: the absolutely gorgeous Eee PC 1018P in white, and the wireless HD slinging WiCast. Let’s take a look at the Asus Eee PC 1081P first, shall we?

The 1081P comes in the standard brown carton that most Eee PCs ship with. But don’t be fooled, contained within this seemingly ordinary brown box is a real looker.

It’s a pretty netbook, that’s for sure, easily one of the prettiest one we’ve seen so far from Asus, and that’s saying a lot. This 10-inch netbook packs the usual hardware for most netbooks of its class – Intel Atom N455 running at 1.66GHz, about 1GB of memory and a 250GB hard drive.

A cursory glance at the right side of the 1018P reveals two USB connectors, audio jacks, an Ethernet plug that swivels down, SD/MMC card slot and the power jack.

On the right side sits another USB slot, a Kensington Security Slot and a d-sub connector.

The keyboard is an island-type one that’s fairly comfortable to type on. The lower chassis is made out of a nice combination of aluminum and plastic. The touchpad gets the same aluminum finish as the wrist rest. Be warned though, the left and right buttons don’t have a seperator, so you’ll have some mis-clicks now and again from it.

On the upper right side beside the WiFi button is the button that boots the Asus Express Gate OS, which is basically a faster booting operating system that allows you to do basic stuff like check your email, view photos and so on.

The Windows experience index isn’t one of the most accurate benchmarking tools, but it does give you a sense of what to expect from a notebook or a netbook according to its score. This is an unedited screenshot from the 1018P, in which Windows gives it a 2.3, pretty much what you’d expect from a netbook.

Another look at the 1018P.

Next on the list is the WiCast EW2000. Now this nifty little gadget allows you to beam HD images from a number of devices to your HDTV wirelessly, up 10 meters as long as there’s line of sight. The device also allows you to transmit up to 8 channel sound while doing so.

This is back view of the transmitter that plugs into your device.

This is the back view of the receiver that goes into HDMI equipped projectors, LCD monitors and of course, HDTVs.

Power and HDMI cables for both the transmitter and receiver.

And that’s it. As usual, watch out for our November review of these awesome gadgets.